Accident description
Last updated: 22 November 2014
Status:
Date:Friday 15 March 1963
Time:ca 13:55
Type:Silhouette image of generic DC6 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Douglas DC-6B
Operator:Lloyd Aéreo Boliviano - LAB
Registration: CP-707
C/n / msn: 43547/204
First flight: 1951
Engines: 4 Pratt & Whitney R-2800
Crew:Fatalities: 3 / Occupants: 3
Passengers:Fatalities: 36 / Occupants: 36
Total:Fatalities: 39 / Occupants: 39
Airplane damage: Damaged beyond repair
Location:near Tacora Volcano (   Peru) show on map
Phase: En route (ENR)
Nature:International Scheduled Passenger
Departure airport:Arica-Chacalluta Airport (ARI/SCAR), Chile
Destination airport:La Paz-El Alto Airport (LPB/SLLP), Bolivia
Flightnumber: 915
Narrative:
The flight departed Arica at 13:27 for an 8-hour VFR flight at cruising flight level 170. The DC-6 struck the Chachacomani Peak.

PROBABLE CAUSE: "A flight under visual flight rules was attempted below the minimum altitude indicated in the flight plan in weather conditions that were marginal for this type of operation and were associated with the severe turbulence which usually exists in that region (western area)."

Classification:
Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT) - Mountain

Sources:
» ICAO Accident Digest No.15 - Volume I, Circular 78-AN/66 (80-85)


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Map
This map shows the airport of departure and the intended destination of the flight. The line between the airports does not display the exact flight path.
Distance from Arica-Chacalluta Airport to La Paz-El Alto Airport as the crow flies is 305 km (190 miles).

This information is not presented as the Flight Safety Foundation or the Aviation Safety Network’s opinion as to the cause of the accident. It is preliminary and is based on the facts as they are known at this time.
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Douglas DC-6

  • 56th loss
  • 704 built
  • 17th worst accident (at the time)
  • 24th worst accident (currently)
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 Peru
  • 2nd worst accident (at the time)
  • 14th worst accident (currently)
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