Accident
Last updated: 25 October 2014
Estado:Final
Fecha:lunes 22 noviembre 2004
Hora:06:15
Tipo:Gulfstream Aerospace G-1159A Gulfstream III
Operador:Business Jet Services
Registración: N85VT
Numéro de série: 449
Año de Construcción: 1984
Horas Totales de la Célula:8566
Motores: 2 Rolls-Royce Spey 511-8
Tripulación:Fatalidades: 3 / Ocupantes: 3
Pasajeros:Fatalidades: 0 / Ocupantes: 0
Total:Fatalidades: 3 / Ocupantes: 3
Daños en la Aeronave: Destruido
Consecuencias: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Ubicación:5 km (3.1 milles) SW of Houston-William P. Hobby Airport, TX (HOU) (   Estados Unidos de América) show on map
Fase: Aproximación (APR)
Naturaleza:Ferry/Posicionado
Aeropuerto de Salida:Dallas-Love Field, TX (DAL/KDAL), Estados Unidos de América
Aeropuerto de Llegada:Houston-William P. Hobby Airport, TX (HOU/KHOU), Estados Unidos de América
Descripción:
A Gulfstream III corporate jet, registered N85VT, was destroyed in an accident near Houston-Hobby Airport, TX (HOU). The three crew members were killed.
The accident flight was scheduled to depart from Dallas-Love Field, TX (DAL), about 05:00 as a positioning flight to Houston-Hobby (HOU). The flight crew planned to pick up former President George H.W. Bush and other passengers at Houston and transport them to Guayaquil, Ecuador. The flight was scheduled to depart Houston about 06:54.
The departure was delayed by 30 minutes because of poor weather conditions at Houston and Dallas. The captain was the flying pilot, and the first officer performed the nonflying pilot duties.
At 05:43, the flight crew received the Houston ATIS, which reported winds were calm, the visibility was 1/8 statute mile (sm) in fog, the runway visual range (RVR) for runway 4 was variable between 1,600 and 2,400 feet, and the clouds were broken at 100 feet and overcast at 9,000 feet.
At 05:58, the first officer contacted the Houston Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) and reported, "approach Gulfstream eight five Victor Tango's with you out of one eight zero for one one thousand [feet], [ATIS] information "Kilo."
The controller cleared the flight directly to the CARCO navigational approach fix, adding, "when you're able for the ILS runway four." The first officer acknowledged the transmission; however, he read back, "ILS runway one four" instead of "runway four." He then stated, "I'll set up our ILS, in here, one oh nine nine."
At 06:05, the Houston TRACON controller instructed the flight crew to descend to and maintain 3,000 feet. Radar data indicated that, about this time, the airplane was at an altitude of about 11,000 feet and was located about 29 miles northwest of HOU. At 06:09, the first officer started the before landing checklist, and, about 1 minute later, he stated, "five miles from CARCO." At 06:10, the controller instructed the flight crew to turn left heading 070° and to maintain an altitude of "2,000 feet or above 'til established [on the] localizer."" The controller then
cleared the flight for the ILS runway 4 approach. At 06:11, the first officer stated, "localizer's alive."
The airplane was descending through an altitude of about 2,900 feet on a southeasterly heading when it started turning left to converge on the ILS localizer. The airplane continued descending during the inbound turn and leveled off at an altitude of about 2,300 feet. At 06:11, the Houston TRACON controller instructed the flight crew to contact the HOU air traffic control tower (ATCT). About 16 seconds later, the first officer contacted the HOU ATCT and stated, "with you on the ILS." The ATCT controller reported calm winds and then cleared the flight to land on runway 4. About this time, the airplane was still at an altitude of about 2,300 feet and was located about 11 miles southwest of HOU. At 06:12, the captain asked the first officer to get the RVR. He then stated, "I can't get approach [APR] mode on my thing." The first officer replied that he could not get the APR mode to activate either. About 06:13, the airplane descended through 2,000 feet. The airplane was about 1,000 feet below the glideslope about this time and that the airplane remained 600 to 1,000 feet below the glideslope until impact.
At 06:12:31, the HOU ATCT controller reported to the first officer that the RVR was 1,600 feet. The first officer acknowledged the transmission. At 06:12:40, the first officer stated, "gear down." At 06:12:57, the first officer asked, "what [is] wrong with this?" The captain responded, "I don't know." At 06:13:03, the first officer further asked, "what do we have set wrong? we have long range [navigation or NAV] or something that we shouldn't have?" Five seconds later, the captain reported, "got NAV VOR one." The first officer stated, "okay, we're high on the glideslope now," and the captain replied, "just gonna have to do it this way." At 06:13:24, the first officer stated, "guess so. yeah you're on [the] glideslope now." However, the airplane was at an altitude of about 1,700 feet and was 700 feet below the glideslope. At 06:13:44, the captain asked the first officer if they were going to descend to an altitude of 244 feet, which was the decision height. The first officer replied, "yeah." At 06: 14:05, the captain asked, "what happened? did you change my frequency?" The first officer responded, "yeah we were down there the VOR frequency was on." He then stated, "we're all squared away now you got it." The captain responded, "yeah, but I, I don't know if I can get back on it in time." The first officer replied, "yeah you will you're squared away now." At that moment the airplane turned right and subsequently intersected the ILS runway 4 localizer centerline. About this time, the airplane was at an altitude of about 900 feet and was 800 feet below the glideslope.
At 06:14:32, the first officer stated, "I'm, I'm outside," and, 8 seconds later, he stated, "okay, comin' up on two forty four." At 06:14:35, the automated radar terminal system minimum safe altitude warning (MSAW) provided visual and aural warnings to the Houston TRACON and HOU ATCT controllers. At 06:14:42, the captain completed the before landing checklist, stating, "give me full flaps." At 06:14:45, the first officer stated, "up," seven times in quick succession. The HOU ATCT controller simultaneously stated, "check your altitude, altitude indicates four hundred feet." The flight crew did not respond to the controller's transmission. No further communications were received from the flight crew.
The airplane tracked the ILS runway 4 localizer and continued to descend until about 06:14:47. The airplane impacted a light pole at an altitude of about 198 feet and about 3 1/4 miles from the runway 4 threshold.


PROBABLE CAUSE: "The National Transportation Safety Board determines that the probable cause of this accident was the flight crew’s failure to adequately monitor and cross-check the flight instruments during the approach. Contributing to the accident was the flight crew’s failure to select the instrument landing system frequency in a timely manner and to adhere to approved company approach procedures, including the stabilized approach criteria."

Fuentes:
» AP
» NTSB

Official accident investigation report
investigating agency: National Transport Safety Bureau (NTSB) - United States of America
report status: Final
report number: NTSB AAB-06-06
report released:02-NOV-2006
duration of investigation:710 days (1 year 11.5 months)
download report: Crash During Approach to Landing, Business Jet Services Ltd., Gulfstream G-1159A (G-III), N85VT, Houston, Texas, November 22, 2004 (NTSB AAB-06-06)
cover

Fotos

photo of Gulfstream G-1159A Gulfstream III N85VT
Aerial photo showing main wreckage and highway
photo of Gulfstream G-1159A Gulfstream III N85VT
View of the burn zone on the wreckage path
photo of Gulfstream G-1159A Gulfstream III N85VT
Section of the fuselage with windows showing impact and fire damage
photo of Gulfstream G-1159A Gulfstream III N85VT
Empennage
photo of Gulfstream G-1159A Gulfstream III XA-FOU
XA-FOU was sold to the U.S. in 2000.
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Map
This map shows the airport of departure and the intended destination of the flight. The line between the airports does not display the exact flight path.
Distance from Dallas-Love Field, TX to Houston-William P. Hobby Airport, TX as the crow flies is 384 km (240 miles).

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