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Last updated: 20 March 2008

01 OCT - Singapore launches confidential safety reporting program
01 OCT - Sita Air Dornier blocks Lukla runway
07 OCT - TSB issues recommendations on standard passenger weights
07 OCT - Malaysia probes third case of airline sabotage
18 OCT - B747 passed within 200 meters of Tokyo Tower
20 OCT - Venezuala on course to return to FAA IASA Category 1 rating
20 OCT - Kalitta Air B747 lands safely in Detroit after losing engine
27 OCT - NTSB to rules on cause of Flight 587 crash
27 OCT - London-Heathrow tests radar to spot debris
28 OCT - UK Airprox Board publishes 11th report
29 OCT - Peruvian airline Nuevo Continente grounded

01 OCT 2004 Singapore launches confidential safety reporting program [to table of contents]
In a bid to boost aviation safety, individuals in Singapore can now report aviation incidents and safety deficiencies anonymously. The information provided will be gathered into a database from which the aviation community can then get extracts through periodic publications. The program is called the Singapore Confidential Aviation Incident Reporting, or SINCAIR. (Channel NewsAsia)

01 OCT 2004 Sita Air Dornier blocks Lukla runway [to table of contents]
Lukla Airport in Nepal was closed for two days with a Sita Air Dornier 228 blocking the runway. The airplane suffered a nose gear collapse on landing and slid, coming to rest blocking Lukla`s single 1600 feet runway. (Nepali Times)

07 OCT 2004 TSB issues recommendations on standard passenger weights [to table of contents]
The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) issued two recommendations concerning the use of standard passenger weights by the Canadian air industry. These recommendations arise from the investigation into last January's fatal crash of a Georgian Express Cessna 208. (TSB Press release A02/2004)

07 OCT 2004 Malaysia probes third case of airline sabotage [to table of contents]
Malaysian police are investigating a third case in 12 months of suspected sabotage involving a Malaysian Airlines plane, after wires were severed in an Airbus A.330. Police said the plane had been grounded at Kuala Lumpur after ground crew found some electrical wires had been cut inside the aircraft, which was being prepared for a flight to Bangkok. (Khaleej Times)

18 OCT 2004 B747 passed within 200 meters of Tokyo Tower [to table of contents]
An Orient Thai Airways Boeing 747 passed within 200 meters of the tip of Tokyo Tower in the early hours of Sept 19, Ministry of Transport officials said. The jet, bound for Haneda Airport, veered off course during a visual approach. The plane was supposed to come in over Tokyo Bay but instead crossed over Tokyo Station and the Nihombashi district, flying at an altitude of 540 meters. (Japan Today)

20 OCT 2004 Venezuala on course to return to FAA IASA Category 1 rating [to table of contents]
According to aviation officials, Venezuela could return early next year to Category 1 status in FAA's International Aviation Safety Assessment (IASA) program. A recent ICAO audit showed significant improvements. (Aviation Daily)

20 OCT 2004 Kalitta Air B747 lands safely in Detroit after losing engine [to table of contents]
A Kalitta Air Boeing 747 cargo plane, N709CK, experienced mechanical difficulties with one of the four engines while en route from Chicago-O'Hare to New York-JFK. Five crewmembers were aboard the airplane when it landed safely at Detroit Metropolitan Airport. It is believed that one of the four engines separated from the airplane while in flight over Lake Michigan. (Kalitta Air)

27 OCT 2004 NTSB to rules on cause of Flight 587 crash [to table of contents]
"The crash of American Airlines flight 587 in November 2001 was caused by an in flight separation of the plane's vertical stabilizer as a result of aerodynamic loads that were created by the first officer's unnecessary and excessive rudder pedal inputs after the aircraft encountered wake turbulence, according to a final report adopted by the NTSB. The Board said that contributing to the crash were characteristics of the airplane's rudder system design and elements of the airline's pilot training program." (NTSB)
Summary of NTSB AAR-04-04

27 OCT 2004 London-Heathrow tests radar to spot debris [to table of contents]
London-Heathrow Airport plans to install a radar-based detection system to monitor runways for potentially dangerous debris. The new system, developed by the UK electronics company QinetiQ, is based on high-resolution millimetre wave radar and can operate around the clock in all weathers. It is said to be able to detect very small objects, such as a suitcase wheel or a metal nut from a distance of 2,000 metres. (Daily Telegraph)

28 OCT 2004 UK Airprox Board publishes 11th report [to table of contents]
A report by the UK Airprox Board (UKAB) states that during 2003 there were 181 Airprox incidents within UK airspace. This is the lowest number yet recorded by pilots and air traffic controllers. Of the 2003 total, there were 64 Airprox involving Commercial Air Transport (CAT), the lowest figure ever recorded. There were no `actual risk` CAT incidents. (CAA)
Analysis of Airprox in UK Airspace - Report No. 11

29 OCT 2004 Peruvian airline Nuevo Continente grounded [to table of contents]
Peru grounded the airline Nuevo Continente, formerly Aero Continente, for safety reasons until it can prove it has the technical and financial capacity to offer services, the Transport Ministry said. (Reuters)