ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 133115
Last updated: 30 July 2014
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Date:18-MAR-1995
Time:1630
Type:Silhouette image of generic EN28 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Enstrom F28C-2
Owner/operator:Skyline Aviation, Inc.
Registration: N5693W
C/n / msn: 490-2
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 3
Other fatalities:0
Airplane damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location:San Gorgonio, CA -   United States of America
Phase: Manoeuvring (airshow, firefighting, ag.ops.)
Nature:Unknown
Departure airport:
Destination airport:
Narrative:
On March 18, 1995, at 1630 hours Pacific standard time, an Enstrom F28C-2, N5693W, collided with mountainous terrain in the San Jacinto Wilderness Area, San Gorgonio, California. The certificated commercial pilot and two passengers were not injured. The helicopter was destroyed by impact with trees and the ground. The helicopter was being operated as a sightseeing flight under 14 CFR Part 91. The local flight originated from an off-airport landing area in Cabazon, California, at 1600 hours on the day of the accident. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time.

The pilot indicated he was flying upslope above a waterfall when he encountered a downdraft and the helicopter began to settle. While attempting to fly out of the downdraft, the pilot determined the helicopter was still descending. The pilot flared the helicopter, struck trees with the main rotor blades, and sloping terrain with the left skid of the landing gear. The helicopter then rolled to the right downslope until the right skid hit the ground. The right skid collapsed and the helicopter came to rest upright on the left skid and right side of the fuselage belly.

The pilot indicated in the pilot accident report, NTSB Form 6120.1/2, there were no mechanical failures or malfunctions with the helicopter before the accident.
PROBABLE CAUSE:the pilot's selection of an inadequate terrain clearance altitude while overflying mountainous terrain.

Sources:
NTSB id 20001207X03149


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