ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 133118
Last updated: 1 November 2014
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Date:14-MAR-1995
Time:1117
Type:Silhouette image of generic P28A model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Piper PA-28-140
Owner/operator:Stephen Kazan
Registration: N3665R
C/n / msn: 287125352
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Airplane damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location:Kingston, NY -   United States of America
Phase: Take off
Nature:Private
Departure airport:20N
Destination airport:44N
Narrative:
On March 14, 1995, about 1117 eastern standard time, a Piper, PA-28-140, N3665R, piloted and owned by Stephen Kazan, on a personal flight, was destroyed during a forced landing in Kingston, New York. The pilot received serious injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The flight was being conducted under 14 CFR Part 91.

The pilot stated in the NTSB 6120.1/2 form, "Departed Kingston Airport and turned toward course. Next memory is awakening in hospital."

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Inspector, the pilot departed runway 15 from Kingston. During the climb, about 100 feet above ground level, the engine lost total power. The pilot made a forced landing in an embankment with heavy brush along side a highway.

Cawley Aviation performed an engine test run under the supervision of the FAA. Also present was Textron Lycoming. The engine test run was performed with the following results: The engine started and fuel was observed leaking from the fuel line connecting from the boost pump outlet to the engine driven fuel pump outlet. The fuel line data tag revealed that the line was manufactured by the Weather Head Company. The manufacture date was December, 1969.

According to the Pilot Operating Handbook (POH), under the normal procedures before takeoff, "Check the fuel selector to make sure it is on the proper tank (fullest)."

During telephone interviews with Cawley Aviation, they stated that the right fuel tank, fuel gascolator and carburetor bowl were found empty. According to Cawley Aviation, the left fuel tank was almost full and the fuel selector valve was found selected to the right tank. In addition, it could not be determined if the fuel leak was due to impact forces.
PROBABLE CAUSE:THE PILOT'S FAILURE TO ASSURE THAT THE FUEL SELECTOR WAS POSITIONED TO A TANK CONTAINING AMPLE FUEL.

Sources:
NTSB id 20001207X03180


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