ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 133143
Last updated: 22 October 2014
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Date:31-MAR-1995
Time:1905
Type:Cessna A188B
Owner/operator:Grismore Flying Service Inc.
Registration: N9228R
C/n / msn: 18802169T
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Airplane damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location:Cairo, OH -   United States of America
Phase: Manoeuvring (airshow, firefighting, ag.ops.)
Nature:Agricultural
Departure airport:OWX
Destination airport:
Narrative:
On March 31, 1995, about 1905 eastern standard time, a Cessna A188B, N9228R, on an aerial application flight, piloted and owned by Gerald G. Grismore, was destroyed when it impacted a barn in Cairo, Ohio. The pilot received serious injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The flight was being conducted under CFR 14 Part 91.

The pilot departed Putnam County Airport, Ottowa, Ohio, destined for Cairo, on a crop dusting flight. The pilot reported he was making the last low pass from west to east. Upon completion of the last pass, about 200 feet above ground level, he made a climbing turn to the north to return to Putnam County.

In an interview by the Ohio State Police, when asked what happened, the pilot stated, "I was heading north and I really cannot remember. All I know [is], the plane was flying rough and I tried to turn right and it stalled..."

During a witness interview with the Ohio State Police, one witness stated,

The plane went upside down and flew horizontal, then tried to pull a 360 degree circle to up right. It could not pull out of the dive soon enough and hit the ground at the bottom of the circle. The plane hit upright, almost horizontal like it would land. Just before it went upside down, it was flying very slow...

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Inspector, the airplane was in a climbing turn when it entered a spin. After recovering from the spin, the airplane was heading south, and impacted a barn. Upon impact the airplane caught fire.

Additionally, in the FAA Inspector's statement, the pilot stated during a telephone interview, he did not have any engine problems, but the airplane flew rough when he went into the turn.
PROBABLE CAUSE:FAILURE OF THE PILOT TO MAINTAIN ADEQUATE AIRSPEED AFTER INITIATING A CLIMB, WHICH RESULTED IN A STALL/SPIN.

Sources:
NTSB id 20001207X03188


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