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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 145639
Last updated: 11 December 2017
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Date:12-MAY-2012
Time:12:45
Type:Silhouette image of generic B36T model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Beechcraft A36TC Bonanza
Owner/operator:L & M Trucking
Registration: N2WZ
C/n / msn: EA-174
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 6
Airplane damage: Substantial
Category:Accident
Location:Harnett Regional Jetport Airport - KHRJ, Erwin, NC -   United States of America
Phase: Take off
Nature:Private
Departure airport:Erwin, NC (HRJ)
Destination airport:Darlington, SC (UDG)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
After what he described as an uneventful engine run-up, the pilot took off from the 5,000-foot-long runway. The pilot stated that when the airplane reached an altitude of about 50 feet, he retracted the landing gear; the engine lost partial power. The airplane yawed to the left and touched down again, impacting a thicket. According to a witness who observed the takeoff, the engine power never decreased until the engine stopped suddenly upon impacting the ground.

Postaccident examination of the engine revealed that the No. 4 cylinder exhaust valve springs had fractured in fatigue. Detailed examination of the springs showed that the fatigue cracking likely originated from one or more of the iron oxide (rust) pits present on the surface of the springs. The springs had been installed in the engine about 1 year before the accident flight. According to the mechanic who installed the springs, he had retrieved them from a similar engine’s cylinder that was removed from another airplane; there was no documentation of the springs’ service history or serviceability.
Probable Cause: The partial loss of engine power shortly after takeoff due to fatigue-fractured exhaust valve springs. Contributing to the accident was the mechanic’s decision to install exhaust valve springs with an unknown service history in the engine’s No. 4 cylinder.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20120514X32313&key=1


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
15-May-2012 10:24 Geno Added
21-Dec-2016 19:28 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]
27-Nov-2017 20:40 ASN Update Bot Updated [Operator, Other fatalities, Departure airport, Destination airport, Source, Narrative]

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