ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 162600
Last updated: 20 December 2014
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Date:01-DEC-2013
Time:13:03 LT
Type:Beechcraft B36TC Bonanza
Owner/operator:Private
Registration: N36ML
C/n / msn: EA-375
Fatalities:Fatalities: 5 / Occupants: 5
Other fatalities:0
Airplane damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location:Near Johnson Creek Airport (3U2), Yellow Pine, ID -   United States of America
Phase: En route
Nature:Private
Departure airport:KBKE
Destination airport:KSMN
Narrative:
Missing near central Idaho town of Yellow Pine on Sunday night 1 December 2013. The plane is had five people on board. A weak ELT (Emergency Locator Transmitter) signal was detected about a mile south of Johnson Creek Airport on Tuesday morning, December 3rd, but the aircraft was not located this day. The search for the plane was officially halted on 12 December 2013.
Jan 10 2014 - aircraft located, all occupants died in the crash.

The instrument-rated pilot was on a 234-nm instrument flight rules (IFR) cross-country flight over mountainous terrain; instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time. During the flight, the pilot notified a controller at the Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) that the airplane was picking up too much ice and requested to divert to an airport located about 96 miles ahead of his position and to descend to 11,000 feet mean sea level (msl). The controller informed the pilot that he could descend to 12,000 feet msl for terrain clearance. Over the following few minutes, the ARTCC controller notified the pilot several times that he had to maintain an altitude of 12,000 feet or above due to terrain clearance, all of which the pilot acknowledged. Following a low-altitude alert issued by the controller, the pilot stated his altitude was 11,500 feet. Subsequently, the pilot advised the controller that he was having engine problems and needed to go to an airport immediately. When the controller asked the pilot to verify his altitude, the pilot responded that he was at 10,000 feet. The controller then asked the pilot if he was able to climb, and the pilot responded “negative.” The controller advised the pilot of an airport that was 24 miles behind his position and asked if he wanted to divert. The pilot responded affirmatively and asked for guidance to the airport. About 1 minute later, the pilot advised the controller that the airplane had “just lost its engine.” The controller advised the pilot that the airport was at the pilot’s six o’clock position and suggested a heading of 253 degrees, adding that another airport was right below their position. There were no further communications with the accident airplane. Wreckage and impact signatures were found consistent with a wings-level, slightly nose-low descent into trees and terrain. Postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of any preexisting mechanical malfunction that would have precluded normal operation. Airmen’s Meteorological Information (AIRMETs) for IFR and mountain obscuration conditions, low-level wind shear and turbulence, and moderate icing were issued for the flight track area and timeframe. In additional to the AIRMETs, multiple pilot reports included reports of light rime-type icing between 8,000 feet and 13,000 feet throughout the region and National Weather Service data was consistent with the pilot reports and AIRMET that were current at the time. The investigation was unable to determine whether the pilot obtained weather information regarding his planned flight. It is likely that the loss of engine power was due to a combination of structural and induction icing during the continued flight in icing conditions in an airplane that was not certified for flight in icing conditions.

NTSB PC: The pilot’s continued flight into known light-to-moderate icing conditions over mountainous terrain. Contributing to the accident was the loss of engine power due to induction icing.

Sources:
http://www.columbian.com/news/2013/dec/02/search-begins-for-missing-plane-in-central-idaho/
http://www.idahostatesman.com/2013/12/02/2904446/small-airplane-went-missing-over.html
http://www.idahostatesman.com/2013/12/12/2923633/search-called-off-for-missing.html
http://flightaware.com/live/flight/N36ML
http://www.ntsb.gov/aviationquery/brief.aspx?ev_id=20131216X13812&key=1

Added Jan 10 2014 aircraft found; http://abclocal.go.com/kgo/story?section=news/local/south_bay&id=9389613

http://www.airport-data.com/aircraft/N36ML.html

Photos of Johnson Creek terrain in winter:
http://sharonmcconnel.wordpress.com/2012/03/01/johnson-creek-winter/

Webcam at Johnson Creek Airport:
http://www.mccallaviation.com/webcams-johnson-creek.html

http://news.msn.com/us/missing-plane-found-in-idaho-5-aboard-dead

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=waClst0BWDU&desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DwaClst0BWDU

Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
03-Dec-2013 07:29 gerard57 Added
03-Dec-2013 19:19 Geno Updated [Time, Aircraft type, Registration, Cn, Location, Departure airport, Destination airport, Source]
04-Dec-2013 06:27 Geno Updated [Source, Embed code, Narrative]
15-Dec-2013 22:26 gerard57 Updated [Total occupants, Source, Narrative]
18-Dec-2013 19:54 FLYINGBROTHER1 Updated [Time, Aircraft type, Departure airport, Destination airport]
24-Dec-2013 03:58 Geno Updated [Time, Source, Narrative]
11-Jan-2014 05:22 bizjets101 Updated [Source, Narrative]
11-Jan-2014 08:53 62.131.14.18 Updated [Source, Damage, Narrative]
04-Sep-2014 08:18 Aerossurance Updated [Narrative]
Number of views: 2404

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