ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 36573
Last updated: 2 October 2014
This information is added by users of ASN. Neither ASN nor the Flight Safety Foundation are responsible for the completeness or correctness of this information. If you feel this information is incomplete or incorrect, you can submit corrected information.
Date:06-JAN-1991
Time:1045
Type:Silhouette image of generic C210 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Cessna T210M
Owner/operator:private
Registration: N6148B
C/n / msn: 62693
Fatalities:Fatalities: 1 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Airplane damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location:Sacramento, CA -   United States of America
Phase: En route
Nature:Executive
Departure airport:
Destination airport:Long Beach, CA (LGB)
Narrative:
THE PILOT OF A CESSNA T210M LOST CONTROL AND COLLIDED WITH LEVEL TERRAIN, 3 MILES SOUTH OF THE APRT WHILE ON AN IFR FLIGHT. RADAR CONTACT WAS ESTABLISHED WITH THE AIRPLANE AS IT CLIMBED THROUGH 300 FT MSL. THE RADAR DATA INDICATED THE AIRPLANE APPEARED TO BE ESTABLISHED ON THE ASSIGNED HEADING OF 150 DEG. AFTER THE PILOT RECEIVED AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL (ATC) CLEARANCE TO JOIN THE FLIGHT PLAN AIRWAY AND RESUME OWN NAVIGATION, THE AIRPLANE WAS OBSERVED TO ENTER DESCENDING RIGHT TURN. AS THE AIRPLANE DESCENDED THROUGH 1,000 FT MSL, ATC ATTEMPTED TO CONTACT THE PILOT WITH NO RESPONSE FROM THE PILOT. WITNESSES ON THE GROUND OBSERVED THE AIRPLANE DESCEND OUT OF THE OVERCAST IN A NEAR VERTICAL ATTITUDE. TWO WITNESSES INDICATED THEY HEARD THE AIRPLANE'S ENGINE OVERHEAD HEADING WESTBOUND AND THEN TURN EASTBOUND. ONE OF THE WITNESSES STATED, 'THE ENGINE SOUNDED NORMAL THERE WAS NO SPUTTERING OR ANYTHING.' EXAMINATION OF THE AIRPLANE WRECKAGE DID NOT REVEAL ANY EVIDENCE OF MECHANICAL FAILURE OR MALFUNCTION. CAUSE: THE FAILURE OF THE PILOT-IN-COMMAND TO MAINTAIN CONTROL OF THE AIRPLANE WHILE FLYING IN INSTRUMENT METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS AND SPATIAL DISORIENTATION OF THE PILOT-IN-COMMAND. CONTRIBUTING TO THE ACCIDENT WAS DIVERSION OF THE PILOT'S ATTENTION TO NAVIGATIONAL TASKS SECONDS BEFORE THE LOSS OF CONTROL.

Sources:
NTSB: http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20001212X16323


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
24-Oct-2008 10:30 ASN archive Added
Number of views: 814

Corrections or additions? ... Edit this accident description