ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 36807
Last updated: 26 October 2014
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Date:11-OCT-1997
Time:0814
Type:Silhouette image of generic C152 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Cessna 152
Owner/operator:Plus One Flyers
Registration: N67293
C/n / msn: 15281729
Fatalities:Fatalities: 1 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Airplane damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location:Julian, CA -   United States of America
Phase: En route
Nature:Private
Departure airport:San Diego, CA (SEE)
Destination airport:Las Vegas, NV (L15)
Narrative:
The noninstrument rated pilot departed on a cross-country flight to Nevada following his receipt of a weather briefing that indicated multiple layers of clouds, and moderate to severe turbulence along the route in an unstable air mass. While climbing en route the pilot requested and received radar flight following service. About 15 minutes after takeoff, the pilot informed the radar controller that he was making a 180-degree turn. Radar data indicates that seconds following the pilot's transmission, the airplane commenced a rapid descent. During the final 60 seconds of recorded flight, the airplane descended from 7,200 to 4,500 feet. The airplane impacted a 3,400-foot msl hillside. Wreckage was found scattered over a 150-foot-long path, about 0.11 mile from its last radar position. Airborne and ground-based witnesses near the area reported the presence of an overcast sky condition with cloud bases near ground level and tops over 13,000 feet. The precipitation intensity varied between sprinkles to heavy rain showers. CAUSE: The pilot's inadequate in-flight planning which resulted in VFR flight into instrument meteorological conditions and the loss of aircraft control. Contributing was the pilot's overconfidence in his ability, clouds, and rain.

Sources:
NTSB: http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20001208X09043


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
24-Oct-2008 10:30 ASN archive Added
Number of views: 661

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