ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 45964
Last updated: 24 November 2014
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Date:17-APR-2001
Time:1627
Type:Silhouette image of generic BE35 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Beechcraft 35 Bonanza
Owner/operator:Frederick G. Lamb
Registration: N2PZ
C/n / msn: D-46
Fatalities:Fatalities: 1 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Airplane damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location:Glenwood Sprgs, CO -   United States of America
Phase: Take off
Nature:Private
Departure airport:Glenwood Spring, CO (GWS)
Destination airport:Boise, ID (BOI)
Narrative:
The pilot was departing on runway 14, with a tailwind, at a mountain airport (elevation 5,916 feet; density altitude 8,016 feet) with near the aft limit CG. Witnesses said that the airplane rotated quickly and excessively. They said that the landing gear doors opened almost immediately even though the airplane's speed appeared slow and its pitch remained excessively high. Several of the witnesses observed the airplane wobbling side to side. A flight instructor, who was watching the departure, said that airplane never got higher than 100 feet above the ground. He said that he saw the airplane pitch up even more (the longitudinal trim was found 10 degrees nose down), and then it stalled into the ground. The pilot had purchased the airplane on March 30, 2001, and reported, on an insurance application for the airplane, that he had approximately 200 hours of total flight experience over 10 years, with 15 hours in retractable gear aircraft. The pilot had accumulated an estimated 20 hours of flight experience in the airplane by the time of the accident. Examination of the airplane and engine revealed no evidence of any pre-impact discrepancies. CAUSE: the pilot's failure to maintain aircraft control, and the subsequent inadvertent stall/mush to the ground. Contributing factors were the pilot's lack of experience in make/model airplane, the high density altitude weather condition, and the pilot's attempted departure with a tailwind.

Sources:
http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20010423X00803&key=1


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
28-Oct-2008 00:45 ASN archive Added
Number of views: 730

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