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Last updated: 4 July 2020
Status:
Date:Sunday 20 June 1965
Type:Silhouette image of generic VC10 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Vickers VC-10-1101
Operator:British Overseas Airways Corporation - BOAC
Registration: G-ARVK
C/n / msn: 813
First flight: 1964-03-28 (1 year 3 months)
Crew:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 3
Passengers:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 6
Total:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 9
Aircraft damage: Substantial
Aircraft fate: Repaired
Location:over Bristol Channel (   United Kingdom)
Phase: En route (ENR)
Nature:Test
Departure airport:London-Heathrow Airport (LHR/EGLL), United Kingdom
Destination airport:London-Heathrow Airport (LHR/EGLL), United Kingdom
Narrative:
Before departure all doors were checked closed and the associated warning lights were out. When the aircraft reached 4,000 ft. during a test flight for Certificate of Airworthiness renewal, the aircraft was depressurised and No.4 engine shut down. The rear passenger door, and rear galley door, warning lights then came on. This caused no undue concern because it had been experienced on several previous occasions when aircraft were being flown de-pressurised. After a three-engined climb to 12,000 ft., No.4 engine was re-started and the climb continued to 20,000 ft., while further tests were carried out. A descent to 15,000 ft . was then initiated, during which pressurisation of the cabin was started. When the cabin differential reached 1 Ib./sq.incb, the rear galley door warning light went out, but that for the passenger door remained on. On reaching 15,000 ft., the cabin differential 12 lb/sq inch, and it was maintained at that level while an inspection of the passenger door was made. It was then noticed that the door was about 1/4 inch from
the fully closed position (to open, it has to be lifted over 2 inch). De-pressurisation and a further descent to 10,000 ft. were started so that the door could be closed properly. At about 12,000 ft., while the cabin was being de-pressurised and the aircraft was still descending, a heavy "thump" was heard and a pressure wave felt. The passenger door had fallen from the aircraft and further inspection showed that it bad struck No.1 engine nacelle and had damaged the port wing boundary fence. Although there was no apparent malfunction, No.1 engine was shut down as a precautionary measure, and the aircraft then returned to London (Heathrow) without further incident.

Classification:

Forced landing on runway

Sources:
» Accidents to Aircraft - A United Kingdom Survey for the year ended 31st December 1965


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This information is not presented as the Flight Safety Foundation or the Aviation Safety Network’s opinion as to the cause of the accident. It is preliminary and is based on the facts as they are known at this time.
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