ASN logo
Last updated: 19 November 2019
Status:Final
Date:Sunday 2 July 2000
Time:11:42
Type:Silhouette image of generic B734 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Boeing 737-49R
Operator:Pro Air
Registration: N460PR
C/n / msn: 28881/2833
First flight: 1996-11-22 (3 years 7 months)
Total airframe hrs:8427
Engines: 2 CFMI CFM56-3C1
Crew:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 6
Passengers:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 122
Total:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 128
Aircraft damage: Substantial
Aircraft fate: Repaired
Location:Orlando International Airport, FL (MCO) (   United States of America)
Phase: Taxi (TXI)
Nature:Domestic Scheduled Passenger
Departure airport:Atlanta-William B. Hartsfield International Airport, GA (ATL/KATL), United States of America
Destination airport:Orlando International Airport, FL (MCO/KMCO), United States of America
Flightnumber:212
Narrative:
A Boeing 737-49R, N460PR, collided with a cargo container loader while taxiing into to the gate on arrival at Orlando International Airport. .
The captain stated that after landing on runway 36R, they were cleared to turn right onto taxiway J and to use taxiway C2 to the gate. He slowed the taxi when he observed an aircraft parked at gate 24, their assigned gate. Ground control then cleared the flight to pull forward on the ramp and exit at taxiway B4, turn right C taxiway and hold short of taxiway C2. He did this and then observed a Boeing 727 push from his gate. He told ground control this and was cleared to taxi to the gate. He did this ahead of Pro Air 216 who was holding short also. This flight was assigned gate 28, which was next door to gate 24. He taxied to gate 24, started his turn in on the taxi line, and followed the marshaller's signals. As he gave him the stop signal, they felt a bump and the first officer and he looked at each other. The marshaller then gave a normal "chocks in" signal and he assumed that the marshaller never knew that they had hit anything. He stated he went out and examined the aircraft and observed ground handling equipment positioned under the left wing and a puncture in the non-metallic portion of the wing tip. The equipment had contacted the wing approximately 1 foot from the wing tip. He checked the position of the aircraft and noted that the nosegear was on the lead-in line and parked between 6 and 8 feet ahead of the 737 stop line. It was parked on the 767/320 stop line. He stated it was obvious that if the aircraft had been stopped in the correct position, the incident with the wingtip would not have occurred.

Ground personnel stated that after an aircraft was pushed from gate 24 for departure, Proair 212 cut in front of the departing aircraft and approached gate 24. One ground person gave the captain a stop signal, but the captain continued toward the gate. Another ground person gave the captain a stop signal, but the captain again continued toward the gate at a "pretty good pace". The ground person then tried to get the captain to steer to the right to avoid ramp equipment. The captain continued straight ahead and the left wing collided with a cargo container loader. Postcrash examination of the aircraft by FAA inspectors and company maintenance personnel showed the left wing front spar lower chord had received damage.

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: "The captain's failure to stop the aircraft when given a stop signal by the ground marshaller and his failure to turn the aircraft when given a turn signal by the ground marshaller as he taxied into the gate resulting in the aircraft's left wing colliding with ground equipment. "

Accident investigation:
cover
Investigating agency: NTSB
Status: Investigation completed
Duration: 155 days (5 months)
Accident number: MIA00LA206
Download report: Summary report

Classification:

Sources:
» NTSB


Photos

Add your photo of this accident or aircraft

Map
This map shows the airport of departure and the intended destination of the flight. The line between the airports does not display the exact flight path.
Distance from Atlanta-William B. Hartsfield International Airport, GA to Orlando International Airport, FL as the crow flies is 647 km (404 miles).

This information is not presented as the Flight Safety Foundation or the Aviation Safety Network’s opinion as to the cause of the accident. It is preliminary and is based on the facts as they are known at this time.
languages: languages

Share