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Last updated: 22 April 2019
Status:Preliminary - official
Date:Friday 8 February 2019
Time:12:16
Type:Silhouette image of generic CVLP model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Convair C-131B Samaritan
Operator:Conquest Air Cargo
Registration: N145GT
C/n / msn: 256
First flight: 1955
Engines: 2 Pratt & Whitney R-2800
Crew:Fatalities: 1 / Occupants: 2
Passengers:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 0
Total:Fatalities: 1 / Occupants: 2
Aircraft damage: Destroyed
Aircraft fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location:21 km (13.1 mls) E off Bay Harbor Islands, FL (   United States of America)
Phase: En route (ENR)
Nature:Cargo
Departure airport:Nassau-Lynden Pindling International Airport (NAS/MYNN), Bahamas
Destination airport:Miami-Opa locka Executive Airport (OPF/KOPF), United States of America
Flightnumber:QAI504
Narrative:
A Convair C-131B Samaritan cargo plane was destroyed when it ditched in the Atlantic Ocean about 32 miles east of the Miami-Opa Locka Executive Airport (OPF), Florida, USA. The captain was fatally injured, and the co-pilot was seriously injured. The airplane was operated by Conquest Air Cargo on a cargo flight from Opa Locka to Nassau, Bahamas and back.
The flight to Nassau was normal until the co-pilot had to adjust the left engine propeller control to adjust speed for cruise flight. When he manipulated the control, there was no movement on the gauge and the power was stuck at 2,400 RPM. He tried to re-set the propeller control circuit breaker, but to no avail. The captain equalized power on both engines and the flight was uneventful to Nassau. Once on the ground, the captain asked the co-pilot to send a text message to maintenance control, but the message never transmitted. The captain told the co-pilot not worry about it and if they were unable to re-set the propeller control on the ground during the engine run-up then they would shut down and call maintenance.
The co-pilot stated to the NTSB that before they began the accident flight, the engines started normally and both propellers were cycled. The left propeller control had re-set itself and they departed for Opa Locka. The co-pilot was Pilot Flying on the return leg and everything was normal until climbing through 4,000 ft when the left engine propeller control stopped working and the power was stuck at 2,400 RPM. The captain tried to adjust the control and bumped the power up to 2,700 RPM. The captain took control of the airplane and tried to stabilize the power on both engines. He leveled off at 4,500 ft, cancelled their instrument flight rules flight plan, and flew via visual flight rules direct to Opa Locka.
The flight was normal until they began their descent down to 1,500 ft. The the right engine suddenly backfired and began to surge. The flight crew used the checklist to feather the propeller and shut down the engine. Shortly after the left engine backfired and began to surge. As the captain flew the airplane, the co-pilot attempted to handle the emergency. Once he realized they were too low and were going to ditch, he asked the captain what he wanted to do. The captain told him to declare a May Day and brace for impact. The co-pilot said the impact with the water was violent and the tail had separated from the empennage. The fuselage was filling up rapidly with water. He unbuckled his seat belt/shoulder harness, grabbed the life raft and exited the airplane.

Accident investigation:
Investigating agency: NTSB
Status: Investigation ongoing
Accident number: ERA19LA096

Classification:
All engine powerloss
Ditching

Sources:
» Miami Herald
» Flightradar24
» Flightaware
» Coast Guard
» NTSB


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Map
This map shows the airport of departure and the intended destination of the flight. The line between the airports does not display the exact flight path.
Distance from Nassau-Lynden Pindling International Airport to Miami-Opa locka Executive Airport as the crow flies is 297 km (185 miles).
Accident location: Approximate; accuracy within a few kilometers.

This information is not presented as the Flight Safety Foundation or the Aviation Safety Network’s opinion as to the cause of the accident. It is preliminary and is based on the facts as they are known at this time.
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