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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 131851
Last updated: 23 July 2020
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Date:20-JUN-1999
Time:21:44
Type:Silhouette image of generic C182 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Cessna 182Q
Owner/operator:Private
Registration: N937FB
C/n / msn: 18267142
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 4
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:Rising Sun, MD -   United States of America
Phase: Unknown
Nature:Private
Departure airport:Linden, NJ (LDJ)
Destination airport:Gaithersburg, MD (GAI)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
The airplane was in level flight at 4,000 feet, on a dark night, in instrument conditions, when the engine lost all power. The pilot performed a forced landing to a river. When the engine was examined, two holes were observed on the top of the engine crankcase. The heads of three connecting rod bolts and portions of a connecting rod bearing were recovered from the bottom of the oil sump pan. All of the main bearings, with the exception of the number four and five main bearings, exhibited accelerated wear and were blackened from heat stress. The number four and five cylinder connecting rod end caps and five connecting rod bolts were forwarded to the Safety Board Materials Lab. All five of the bolts exhibited severe necking at the fracture and deformation in the shafts. The large amount of deformation and necking was consistent with a single deformation event that occurred at a high temperature. The connecting rod caps exhibited similar characteristics, a gross amount of deformation, but with a lack of fracture. This was consistent with deformation at a high temperature. The engine had bee remanufactured about 9 years and 941 hours prior to the accident.

Probable Cause: The failure of the connecting rod end bolts, due to an overtemperature condition.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20001212X19103&key=1


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
21-Dec-2016 19:25 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]
14-Dec-2017 08:27 ASN Update Bot Updated [Departure airport, Destination airport, Source, Narrative]

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