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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 131945
Last updated: 24 December 2020
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Date:17-AUG-1993
Time:09:10
Type:Silhouette image of generic P28A model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Piper PA-28-140
Owner/operator:Jeffrey L. Shawd
Registration: N4477X
C/n / msn: 287625041
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 2
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:Marshall, MN -   United States of America
Phase: Manoeuvring (airshow, firefighting, ag.ops.)
Nature:Private
Departure airport:D19
Destination airport:MML
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
On August 17, 1993, about 0910 central daylight time, a Piper PA- 28-140 airplane, N4477X, was destroyed when it collided with terrain near Marshall, Minnesota. The airplane was substantially damaged. The non-instrument rated private pilot and the sole passenger aboard received serious injuries. Instrument meteorological conditions existed in the vicinity of the crash site. The personal flight originated from Luverne, Minnesota, about 0830 without a flight plan and operated under 14 CFR 91.

The pilot received a weather briefing prior to departure. His intended destination was Wilmar, Minnesota. The FAA Flight Service Station Specialist the pilot spoke with on the telephone indicated that VFR flight was not recommended along the proposed route of flight. The specialist noted areas of fog, reduced ceilings and visibility, and IFR conditions.

According to the pilot's written statement to the NTSB, at the time he departed Luverne, he estimated the cloud ceiling as 500 to 700 feet above the ground. The closer he got to Marshall, the lower the clouds became and the visibility deteriorated. He decided to turn around and return to Luverne, but he inadvertently entered the clouds and became disoriented. When the airplane came out, it was in a nose low attitude. The pilot said he pulled the nose up but still struck the ground.
PROBABLE CAUSE:THE PILOT'S IMPROPER DECISION TO DEPART AFTER RECEIVING A WEATHER BRIEFING WHICH FORECASTED IMC EN ROUTE AND HIS LOSS OF AIRCRAFT CONTROL DUE TO SPATIAL DISORIENTATION.

Sources:

NTSB id 20001211X13108


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
21-Dec-2016 19:25 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]

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