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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 133023
Last updated: 10 January 2020
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Date:01-AUG-1995
Time:11:45
Type:Silhouette image of generic C172 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Cessna 172A
Owner/operator:Charles E. Spencer
Registration: N345RB
C/n / msn: 47512
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 2
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:Chickaloon, AK -   United States of America
Phase: Manoeuvring (airshow, firefighting, ag.ops.)
Nature:Private
Departure airport:5L6
Destination airport:
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
On August 1, 1995, about 1145 Alaska daylight time, a float equipped Cessna 172A, N345RB, collided with terrain while maneuvering in a remote area, about 30 miles east of Chickaloon, Alaska. The airplane was being operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) local area personal flight when the accident occurred. The airplane, operated by the pilot, was destroyed. The certificated private pilot received serious injuries. The sole passenger received minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed. A VFR flight plan was filed. The flight originated at the Wasilla Lake Seaplane base, Wasilla, Alaska, at 1042.

The pilot reported that he was flying in the area of Sheep Mountain and Caribou Creek about 5,500 feet mean sea level (MSL). He indicated that the airplane encountered a strong downdraft and began losing altitude and airspeed at full power. The pilot began a turn away from rising terrain but the airplane stalled about 40 feet above the ground. The left wingtip struck a small rise and the airplane cartwheeled downslope. The engine was torn from the airplane and the fuselage was broken in-half. The airplane came to rest about 4,800 feet msl. The airplane was reported overdue to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and an alert notice (ALNOT) was issued at 1603. Search aircraft located the accident site by tracking the airplane's emergency locator transmitter (ELT) about 1900.

The pilot reported that the airplane was 128 pounds below gross weight. A review of climb data from the airplane owners manual revealed that at gross weight, 5,000 feet and 41 degrees F, the airplane should have been capable of a 350 foot per minute climb. The pilot also indicated that scattered rain showers were present in the area.
PROBABLE CAUSE:THE PILOT'S INADVERTENT ENCOUNTER WITH ADVERSE WEATHER CONDITIONS AND FAILURE TO MAINTAIN SUFFICIENT ALTITUDE/CLEARANCE FROM THE TERRAIN TO COMPENSATE FOR SUCH CONDITIONS. FACTORS RELATED TO THE ACCIDENT WERE: DOWNDRAFTS, THE PROXIMITY OF MOUNTAINOUS TERRAIN, AND THE PILOT'S INADEQUATE WEATHER EVALUATION.

Sources:

NTSB id 20001207X04121


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
21-Dec-2016 19:25 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]

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