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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 133053
Last updated: 1 December 2019
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Date:02-JUL-1995
Time:09:37
Type:Silhouette image of generic BE23 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Beechcraft 23A
Owner/operator:Private
Registration: N2397Q
C/n / msn: M588
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 4
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:Spearfish, SD -   United States of America
Phase: Take off
Nature:Private
Departure airport:
Destination airport:
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
On July 2, 1995, at 0937 mountain daylight time (mdt), a Beech B-23A, N2397Q, and piloted by a private pilot, was destroyed during a collision with the ground and subsequent fire shortly after takeoff from runway 16 (3,200' X 100' dry sod) at the Black Hills/Clyde Ice Field, Spearfish, South Dakota. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The 14 CFR Part 91 personal flight was not operating on a flight plan. The pilot received serious injuries and the three passengers reported minor injuries. The flight departed Spearfish, South Dakota, at 0935 mdt.

The pilot stated the airplane rotated about 3/4's of the way down the runway at 75 to 85 mph indicated airspeed. He said the airplane climbed to about 75 or 100 feet above the ground and began to stall. The pilot said he lowered the pitch attitude in an attempt to gain airspeed. The airplane did not gain airspeed and descended into the ground.

A passenger in the airplane stated the airplane appeared to come to a stop shortly after takeoff. He said the airplane "...leaned left and descended with left wing down... ." An eye witness said he "...saw [the] aircraft extremely low, but level as it crossed..." a major highway. He continued, "Then [the] left wing dropped abruptly... [and the] plane then entered [the] ditch, bounced two times, came to a stop."

According to a Federal Aviation Administration Principal Operations Inspector (POI) representing the NTSB on-scene, the airplane's weight and balance were within the manufacturer's limits. He said the airplane performance data showed it had adequate runway length for takeoff. On the accident date, construction equipment was located near the intersection of runways 12 and 16. Runway 16's usable length was reduced to 3,200 feet due to the construction equipment.

The pilot's NTSB Form 6120.1/2 showed the pilot had not had a bienniel flight review since April 15, 1991. His medical date was shown as July 7, 1989. The pilot said his logbook was destroyed in the fire. He said he was unable to provide a breakdown of his flight time.

Examination of the airframe and engine revealed no mechanical defects that would prevent it from performing to its certificated limitations.
PROBABLE CAUSE:THE PILOT'S FAILURE TO MAINTAIN FLYING SPEED RESULTING IN AN AERODYNAMIC STALL. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THIS ACCIDENT WERE REMEDIAL ACTION BY THE PILOT WAS NOT POSSIBLE DUE TO THE LOW ALTITUDE AT WHICH THE STALL TOOK PLACE.

Sources:

NTSB id 20001207X03884


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
21-Dec-2016 19:25 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]

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