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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 133098
Last updated: 8 April 2019
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Date:16-AUG-1995
Time:07:20
Type:Beechcraft 65 Queen Air
Owner/operator:Caribbean Food And Produce
Registration: N5078C
C/n / msn: LF-12
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:Caribbean Sea -   Atlantic Ocean
Phase: En route
Nature:Unknown
Departure airport:STX
Destination airport:TDCF
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
On August 16, 1995, about 0720 Atlantic standard time, N5078C, a Beech BE-65 registered to and operated by Caribbean Food and Produce ditched in the Caribbean Sea while on a 14 CFR Part 91 cargo flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and a VFR flight plan was filed. The airplane was not recovered and is presumed to be destroyed. The pilot, the sole occupant, was located and rescued with minor injuries. The flight originated from St. Croix, Virgin Islands, about 45 minutes earlier.

The pilot was hauling company supplies and was en route to Canefield Airport, Dominica. He reported the No. 2 engine was running rough. The engine then failed and the pilot was not able to feather the propeller. He ditched the airplane about 75 miles southeast of St. Croix. After exiting the airplane he inflated a raft, and was located by rescue personnel about 4 hours later.
PROBABLE CAUSE:LOSS OF ENGINE POWER FOR UNDETERMINED REASONS. CONTRIBUTING TO THE ACCIDENT WAS THE INABILITY OF THE PILOT TO FEATHER THE PROPELLER.

Sources:

NTSB id 20001207X04331


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
06-Feb-2015 18:21 wf Updated [Cn, Narrative]
21-Dec-2016 19:25 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]
03-May-2017 12:17 WILDA Updated [Cn]

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