ASN logo
ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 139287
Last updated: 25 July 2019
This information is added by users of ASN. Neither ASN nor the Flight Safety Foundation are responsible for the completeness or correctness of this information. If you feel this information is incomplete or incorrect, you can submit corrected information.

Date:17-OCT-2011
Time:11:00
Type:Silhouette image of generic C172 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Cessna R172K Hawk XP
Owner/operator:Private
Registration: N758GY
C/n / msn: R1723096
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 2
Aircraft damage: Substantial
Category:Accident
Location:High Street, near Richmond Road, Williamsburg, VA -   United States of America
Phase: En route
Nature:Private
Departure airport:Williamsburg, VA (JGG)
Destination airport:Williamsburg, VA (JGG)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
The pilot and his passenger were on their way back from 1-hour personal flight. According to the pilot, as the airplane was descending through 1,500 feet into the traffic pattern, the engine lost power, but the propeller continued to windmill. The pilot performed a forced landing to an open field, but during the landing the left wing collided with the corner of the parking garage before it came to rest in a parking lot. Postaccident examination of the airplane’s fuel system did not reveal any discrepancy that would have precluded normal engine operation. An estimated 20 gallons of fuel was recovered, which was equally distributed between the airplane’s left and right wing fuel tanks. The engine was test run and it operated satisfactorily. The examination of the mechanical components of the airplane and engine did not reveal any discrepancies that would account for the sudden loss of engine power. Cylinder head and exhaust gas temperatures data retrieved for the airplane’s onboard engine data monitoring unit was consistent with a sudden stop of fuel or ignition supply to the engine at the time of loss of power. The reason for the sudden stop of fuel or ignition supply could not be determined.
Probable Cause: A total loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20111017X52347&key=1


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
17-Oct-2011 12:44 RobertMB Added
20-Oct-2011 12:45 harro Updated [Embed code]
21-Dec-2016 19:26 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]
27-Nov-2017 17:20 ASN Update Bot Updated [Operator, Other fatalities, Departure airport, Destination airport, Source, Narrative]

Corrections or additions? ... Edit this accident description