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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 174736
Last updated: 8 November 2019
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Date:08-FEB-2004
Time:14:15
Type:Silhouette image of generic BE23 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Beechcraft B23
Owner/operator:Private
Registration: N234DD
C/n / msn: MC-129
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Substantial
Category:Accident
Location:Mena, AR -   United States of America
Phase: Landing
Nature:Ferry/positioning
Departure airport:Mena, AR (M39)
Destination airport:Houston, TX (EFD)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
After takeoff from runway 17 (a 6,000-foot-long and 100-foot-wide asphalt runway), the 5,625-hour air transport pilot made a left downwind departure and climbed to an altitude of 2,000 feet above ground level (agl), when the engine lost power. The pilot attempted to re-start the engine, but was unsuccessful. He turned left and aligned the airplane with the runway while descending. The pilot flew along the length of the runway, but never landed. As the airplane approached the end of the runway, he aligned the airplane with a taxiway, but decided to turn and land in an open clearing, where it struck trees and power lines. The engine was run on the airframe with the original bent propeller still installed for five minutes. After installation of a new propeller, and the engine was started, it ran continuously at various power settings without interruption. No mechanical deficiencies were noted. The airplane was out of annual inspection, and was being ferried to Houston, Texas where it was scheduled to undergo an annual inspection. The FAA issued the ferry permit based on the belief that the airplane had undergone an annual inspection over a year ago. Further examination revealed that the airplane had not received an annual inspection since 1988. The reason for the loss of engine power could not be determined.
Probable Cause: The loss of engine power for undetermined reasons and the pilot's misjudgment of altitude and distance during the forced landing which resulted in a collision with trees and transmission wires.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20040217X00194&key=1


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
21-Mar-2015 18:50 Noro Added
21-Dec-2016 19:30 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]
07-Dec-2017 17:41 ASN Update Bot Updated [Cn, Other fatalities, Nature, Departure airport, Destination airport, Source, Narrative]

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