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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 178401
Last updated: 16 August 2019
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Date:05-FEB-1969
Time:
Type:Silhouette image of generic F4 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
McDonnell Douglas F-4C Phantom
Owner/operator:92nd TFS, 81st TFW, USAF (92nd Tactical Fighter Squadron, 81st Tactical Fighter Wing, United States Air Force)
Registration: 64-0873
C/n / msn: 1258
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 2
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location:near RAF Lindholme, Yorkshire -   United Kingdom
Phase: En route
Nature:Military
Departure airport:RAF Bentwaters, Suffolk
Destination airport:
Narrative:
Two F-4C-24-MC Phantoms of 92nd TFS, 81st TFW, USAF collided in mid air over Humberside, East Yorkshire. One aircraft (64-0874) came come near Selby, North Yorkshire, and the other (64-0873, also from the 92nd TFS, 81st TFW, USAF) came down near RAF Lindholme. All four crew (two in each aircraft) ejected safely.

The two "back seaters" in each aircraft have not yet been identified, but the two pilots involved were Lt.Col D. T. Lynch, and Captain A. E. Sultan. Both ejected safely, although it is not yet clear which pilot was in which aircraft. There is an anecdote related to this incident:

"This has a humorous story to it. RAF Lindholme Officers Mess had a ghost (allegedly) known as Lindholme Willie who used to walk the corridors in WWII flying kit – this was against the rules/etiquette and anyone who saw him would turn to tell him so, by which time he had disappeared. On the night of the F-4 crash the duty runway controller was sitting in his old mobile caravan waiting for the last Hastings to land, the weather was misty as normal from the marshy area to the east of the airfield, he heard a knock at the door and standing in the mist and in very poor light only lit by the red light atop the van stood one F-4 pilot in full flying gear slightly muddy with parachute, the controller an oldish Crpl leapt from the van and sprinted nearly a mile to the ATC tower and took several days to get over the shock, but I expect the pilot did as well. (Well that’s the story I heard from someone who was in the tower that night!)"

Sources:

1. http://web.archive.org/web/20171029224940/http://www.ejection-history.org.uk:80/Aircraft_by_Type/F-4_PHANTOM_USA/f4_phantom_US_1969.htm
2. http://www.joebaugher.com/usaf_serials/1964.html


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
08-Aug-2015 00:51 Dr. John Smith Added

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