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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 198767
Last updated: 23 March 2021
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Date:17-OCT-2015
Time:11:15
Type:Silhouette image of generic C82R model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Cessna R182
Owner/operator:Private
Registration: N381MB
C/n / msn: R18200385
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 2
Aircraft damage: Substantial
Category:Accident
Location:Sanford, FL -   United States of America
Phase: Unknown
Nature:Training
Departure airport:Sanford, FL (SFB)
Destination airport:Sanford, FL (SFB)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
The private pilot and his instructor were performing practice takeoffs and landings. Following an uneventful short field takeoff and landing, the pilot set up for a short field touch-and-go landing. After a "normal" touchdown and before the application of full power, the instructor noted a "shudder" and "nose wheel shimmy," and the nose landing gear collapsed. The propeller struck the paved surface of the runway and the airplane came to a stop. Postaccident examination of the nose gear revealed that its actuator remained secured to the drag attachment fitting and that the nose landing gear was in the "down and locked" position. The drag attachment fitting was separated from the airframe. Subsequent examination revealed that the rivets that secured the drag attachment fitting to the airframe were sheared in overload. The shear loads were in the forward direction, which was inconsistent with the loads typically encountered during landing, suggesting that the damage predated the accident flight. The operator was not aware of any recent damage to the airplane; however, it had been recently rented for an extended period of time.
Probable Cause: A collapse of the nose landing gear due to a separation of the drag attachment fitting from the airframe. The separation was likely due to preexisting damage from an undetermined event.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20151203X15425&key=1


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
19-Aug-2017 15:07 ASN Update Bot Added

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