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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 201828
Last updated: 5 December 2019
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Date:15-JAN-1999
Time:18:00
Type:Silhouette image of generic AEST model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Piper PA-60-602P
Owner/operator:Private
Registration: N72EZ
C/n / msn: 60-8265002
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Substantial
Category:Accident
Location:Lynchburg, VA -   United States of America
Phase: Unknown
Nature:Private
Departure airport:Lancaster, PA (LNS)
Destination airport:
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
While en route, the pilot noticed oil streaming out of the airplane's left engine cowling and secured the left engine. Approximately 3 miles from his destination, the right engine lost total power and the pilot performed a forced landing to a highway. Examination of the airplane 50 minutes after the accident revealed that both wings were separated outboard of the engines. There was no fuel or odor of fuel present in or around the wing fuel tanks, and approximately 1.5 gallons of fuel was drained from the airplane's fuselage fuel tank, which was not compromised. Examinations of both engines revealed a hole burnt through the number 6 piston of the left engine, and damage to the piston was consistent with detonation. A test run of the airplane's right engine did not reveal any pre-impact discrepancies which would have precluded normal engine operation. The airplane's total usable fuel capacity was 165.5 gallons. The airplane had been flown about 2 1/2 hours since it's last refueling, and the estimated fuel used was about 122.5 gallons. The airplane was equipped with a fuel flow indicating system; which when powered after the accident indicated that 40.5 gallons of fuel remained, and 124.1 gallons had been used since the last re-fueling.
Probable Cause: Fuel exhaustion for undetermined reasons.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20001204X00104&key=1


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
25-Nov-2017 15:59 ASN Update Bot Added

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