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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 202159
Last updated: 13 August 2019
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Date:15-APR-1999
Time:11:05
Type:Silhouette image of generic C177 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Cessna 177
Owner/operator:Private
Registration: N3564F
C/n / msn: 17700633
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Substantial
Category:Accident
Location:Auburn, WA -   United States of America
Phase: Landing
Nature:Training
Departure airport:S50
Destination airport:
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
The student pilot, with a total of 41 hours of flight experience, including 4 hours of solo time, encountered rough air after take off at the Auburn Municipal airport. He then departed the pattern and after about 15 minutes returned and executed an approach to runway 16 reporting that 'the air had become considerably rougher.' This was terminated in a go-around after which he initiated a second approach utilizing less flap extension and a higher power setting/approach speed. The student reported that just prior to touchdown 'a very strong crosswind gust from the east seemed to lift the plane upward and to the right.' Perceiving that he had insufficient runway available for another go-around, he chose to commit to a landing. He reported that 'the aircraft landed very hard and bounced very high.' The aircraft then departed the right side of the runway. Winds at the time of the accident at an airport eight nautical miles north-northwest were northerly at 13 knots. One hour later they were reported as northerly at 12 knots with gusts to 20 knots. Winds at the time of the accident at another airport ten nautical miles north were westerly at 18 knots. One hour later they were reported as north-northeasterly at 12 knots with gusts to 22 knots.
Probable Cause: The pilot's improper flare. Contributing factors were gusty, crosswind conditions, and the student's minimal overall experience.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20001205X00565&key=1


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
26-Nov-2017 12:41 ASN Update Bot Added

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