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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 212517
Last updated: 21 February 2020
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Date:20-JAN-2018
Time:13:00
Type:Silhouette image of generic C172 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Cessna 172P
Owner/operator:Private
Registration: N64204
C/n / msn: 17275534
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Substantial
Category:Accident
Location:Cloverdale, CA -   United States of America
Phase: Unknown
Nature:Private
Departure airport:Santa Rosa, CA (KSTS)
Destination airport:Cloverdale, CA (O60)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
The private pilot reported that he intended to make two full-stop landings before returning to his home base. The pilot entered the traffic pattern and announced his position as he maneuvered to final approach. The pilot stated that the approach was stable but appeared to be short. He added power and adjusted the pitch for the projected touchdown point beyond the displaced threshold. When the airplane was over the displaced threshold, the stability of the approach was lost. The pilot suspected a swirl of wind or updraft was encountered as the wing raised more than he expected from previous landings at this airport. The pilot tried to regain the runway centerline and level the wings; however, he was unsuccessful. The pilot then made a radio transmission that he was going around. He applied power and raised the flaps (he reported that his intention was to extend the flaps 20o; however, postaccident, the flap position was fully retracted). The airplane rolled to the left and contacted the ground, coming to rest inverted off the side of the runway.
The forward fuselage, left wing and vertical stabilizer were substantially damaged.
The pilot reported that there were no mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane or engine that would have precluded normal operation.



Probable Cause: The pilot's failure to maintain airplane control during the approach and his delayed decision to go around.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20180123X55135&key=1

Accident investigation:
cover
  
Investigating agency: NTSB
Status: Investigation completed
Duration: 5 months
Download report: Final report


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
22-Jun-2018 07:41 ASN Update Bot Added

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