ASN logo
ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 213298
Last updated: 14 June 2020
This information is added by users of ASN. Neither ASN nor the Flight Safety Foundation are responsible for the completeness or correctness of this information. If you feel this information is incomplete or incorrect, you can submit corrected information.

Date:14-SEP-1969
Time:11:34
Type:Silhouette image of generic BE23 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Beechcraft A23A
Owner/operator:Civil Flying Services Pty Ltd
Registration: VH-CFP
C/n / msn:
Fatalities:Fatalities: 4 / Occupants: 4
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location:1.6km NE of Castella, VIC -   Australia
Phase: Unknown
Nature:Private
Departure airport:YLIL
Destination airport:YLIL
Investigating agency: BASI
Narrative:
At the time of takeoff, the weather conditions in the area were a 5/8th cloud coverage with a base of 3,000 feet; the wind was from the south-west at 10-15 knots and the visibility was 20 miles, reducing to 5 miles in scattered areas of light rain. The pilot, who was restricted to operating in the local training area with which he was familiar, had been briefed to watch for weather deterioration. About half an hour after the aircraft departed, an instructor noticed a squall, 5-6 miles wide, rapidly advancing from the south-west. He made a radio call to the pilot who advised he was three miles north-east of the aerodrome and returning, but he was not seen. A short time later the pilot advised he was heading for the Healesville area to avoid the storm. At about 1100 hours the instructor took off intending to guide the pilot back to the aerodrome but he encountered heavy rain, hail, snow and severe turbulence beneath a cloud base of 700-800 feet. The Musketeer pilot then reported that he was five miles north east at 1,500 feet and he had "zero visibility" whereupon he was advised to descend on a southerly heading to 1,000 feet over lowering terrain to where the weather had begun to clear. At about 1125 hours the pilot advised he was heading 120 degrees at 1,300 feet, which corrected for aerodrome height, is 1,560 feet AMSL. Nothing further was heard from the aircraft and it was found a fortnight later on a thickly wooded hillside. There was no evidence to show the aircraft was other than airworthy at the time of the accident.

Sources:

https://www.atsb.gov.au/publications/investigation_reports/1969/aair/aair196902375/
https://www.atsb.gov.au/media/24801/196902375.pdf

Accident investigation:
cover
  
Investigating agency: BASI
Status: Investigation completed
Duration:
Download report: Final report


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
15-Jul-2018 04:01 Pineapple Added
15-Jul-2018 11:03 Pineapple Updated [Aircraft type, Operator]

Corrections or additions? ... Edit this accident description