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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 228980
Last updated: 12 September 2019
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Date:01-JUN-2019
Time:14:45 LT
Type:Sky Arrow 650T
Owner/operator:Private
Registration: G-BYCY
C/n / msn: PFA 298-13332
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location:Near Upfield Farm (Newport City) Aerodrome, Newport, Gwent -   United Kingdom
Phase: Approach
Nature:Private
Departure airport:Upfield Farm (Newport City) Aerodrome, Newport, Gwent
Destination airport:Upfield Farm (Newport City) Aerodrome, Newport, Gwent
Narrative:
Sky Arrow 650T, G-BYCY: Engine failure with forced landing mishap, Upfield Farm (Newport City), Newport, Gwent, 1 June 2019. The official AAIB report into the incident was published on 12 September 2019, and the following is an excerpt from it:

"The aircraft was downwind to land after a short cross-country flight, when the pilot became aware of a “rumble” from the engine followed by a stoppage. The pilot turned the aircraft into wind and carried out a forced landing in an uneven field. During the landing the aircraft sustained severe damage and the pilot suffered minor injuries. The engine stoppage was caused by the failure of the No 3 big end bearing.

This may have been the result of lubrication failure, but it could not be positively determined whether there was a No 3 bearing problem that led to lubrication failure or a lubrication problem that led to the bearing failure.

The pilot reported that he had flown a short uneventful flight along the Welsh coast and had returned to Newport City Aerodrome (formerly Upfield Farm). Whilst on the downwind leg, he “heard and felt a rumble” from the rear of the aircraft.

The pilot tried to “add power” but the engine stopped. He was unable to make the airfield so turned into wind to land in what appeared to be a suitable field. However, the field was “full of ditches” that were indiscernible from the air and the aircraft was severely damaged during the landing. The pilot sustained minor injuries.

The Sky Arrow 650T is a microlight aircraft with a high wing. The engine is mounted behind the trailing edge of the wing above the rear fuselage and drives a pusher propeller. The pilot sits forward of the engine.

The engine was examined and found to have suffered a catastrophic mechanical failure of one of its connecting rods which had broken and was protruding from the crankcase. A more detailed assessment was carried out with the assistance of the Light Aircraft Association (LAA). The damage was centred around the No 3 connecting rod big end bearing and journal. There was also significant secondary damage to the No 3 piston.

The evidence on the bearing fragments suggested lubricating oil starvation leading to premature and accelerated wear. The other journals and big end bearings were normal and well lubricated. However, it could not be positively determined whether there was a No 3 bearing problem that led to lubrication failure or a lubrication problem that led to the bearing failure."

Nature of damage sustained to airframe: Per the above AAIB report the airframe was declared "Beyond economic repair", and the registration was cancelled (aircraft de-registered) on 9 August 2019

Sources:

1. AAIB Final Report: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/5d5180dbe5274a42dd9924b3/Sky_Arrow_650T_G-BYCY_09-19.pdf
2. G-BYCY on April 8 2011 at Cardiff Airport: https://www.jetphotos.com/photo/7096970
3. http://www.planelogger.com/Aircraft/Registration/G-BYCY/894106
4. https://www.flickr.com/photos/53513929@N08/5600050941


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
12-Sep-2019 20:23 Dr. John Smith Added
12-Sep-2019 20:24 Dr. John Smith Updated [Narrative]
12-Sep-2019 20:24 Dr. John Smith Updated [Embed code]
12-Sep-2019 20:25 Dr. John Smith Updated [Embed code]

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