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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 35601
Last updated: 23 July 2020
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Date:15-MAY-1998
Time:09:15
Type:Silhouette image of generic C172 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Cessna 172M
Owner/operator:private
Registration: N9212H
C/n / msn: 17266018
Fatalities:Fatalities: 2 / Occupants: 2
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Substantial
Category:Accident
Location:Palmer, AK -   United States of America
Phase: En route
Nature:Private
Departure airport:Big Lake, AK (BGQ)
Destination airport:Petersburg, AK (PSG)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
The noninstrument rated private pilot was issued adverse condition warnings and urgent pilot reports for severe turbulence. His route of flight took him up channeled, mountainous terrain requiring a climb to a minimum of 9,000 feet msl. Winds aloft were forecast to be between 28 and 41 knots. Surface winds were forecast to be in a downslope direction at 25 knots gusting to 50 knots from channeled terrain. Cessna 172 performance charts for the 180 horsepower engine indicate a maximum climb rate available of 405 feet per minute at 8,000 feet pressure altitude. Ceilings of 8,500 feet were reported on the west side of the mountains. The pilot radioed that he was going to try to get on top through a hole. The airplane was located on the west side of a peak, in deep snow, at 8,600 feet msl, about 40 hours after the departure. The Emergency Locator Transmitter signal was masked by terrain and wreckage. Both occupants were lightly dressed, and appeared to have survived the impact. The pilot was described by acquaintances as inexperienced and prone to taking chances with the airplane. CAUSE: The pilot's intentional flight into known adverse weather conditions. Contributing factors were the terrain induced turbulence, clouds, the pilot's overconfidence in his abilities, and mountainous terrain conditions.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20001211X09965


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
24-Oct-2008 10:30 ASN archive Added
21-Dec-2016 19:22 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]

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