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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 36529
Last updated: 15 February 2020
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Date:11-APR-1996
Time:08:24
Type:Silhouette image of generic C177 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Cessna 177B
Owner/operator:private
Registration: N35207
C/n / msn: 17702266
Fatalities:Fatalities: 3 / Occupants: 3
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:Cheyenne, WY -   United States of America
Phase: Take off
Nature:Private
Departure airport:Cheyenne, WY (CYS)
Destination airport:Lincoln, NB (LNK)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
A 7 year old pilot trainee Jessica Dubroff (passenger), accompanied by her father Lloyd Dubroff (a passenger) and the pilot-in-command (PIC) Joe Reid, were engaged in a trans-continental record attempt involving 6,660 miles of flying in 8 consecutive days. The 1st leg of the trip (about 8 hours of flying) had been accomplished the previous day and began/ended with considerable media attention. On the morning of the 2nd day, the PIC and the pilot trainee participated in media interviews, pre-flighted, and then loaded the airplane. The PIC then received a weather briefing and was advised of moderate icing conditions, turbulence, IFR flight precautions, and a cold front in the area of the departure airport. The airplane was taxied in rain to takeoff on runway 30. While taxiing, the PIC acknowledged receiving information that the wind was from 280 degrees at 20 gusting 30 knots and that a departing Cessna 414 pilot reported moderate low-level windshear of +/- 15 knots. The airplane then departed on runway 30 towards a nearby thunderstorm and began a gradual turn to an easterly heading. Witnesses described the airplane's climb rate and speed as slow, and they observed the airplane enter a roll and descent that was consistent with a stall. Density altitude at the airport was 6,670 feet. The airplane's gross weight was calculated to be 84 pounds over the maximum limit at the time of the impact.

CAUSE: The pilot-in-command's improper decision to take off into deteriorating weather conditions (including turbulence, gusty winds, and an advancing thunderstorm and associated precipitation) when the airplane was overweight and when the density altitude was higher than he was accustomed to, resulting in a stall caused by failure to maintain airspeed. Contributing to the pilot-in-command's decision to take off was a desire to adhere to an overly ambitious itinerary, in part, because of media commitments.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20001208X05676

Safety recommendations:

Safety recommendation A-97-19 issued 21 March 1997 by NTSB to AIRCRAFT OWNERS & PILOTS ASSOCIATION, THE EXPERIMENTAL AIRCRAFT ASSOCIATION, & THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS
Safety recommendation A-97-20 issued 21 March 1997 by NTSB to FAA
Safety recommendation A-97-21 issued 21 March 1997 by NTSB to FAA

Accident investigation:
cover
  
Investigating agency: NTSB
Status: Investigation completed
Duration:
Download report: Final report


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
24-Oct-2008 10:30 ASN archive Added
16-Oct-2011 01:32 Anon. Updated [Operator, Departure airport, Narrative]
23-Oct-2011 01:04 Anon. Updated [Narrative]
21-Dec-2016 19:23 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]
15-Feb-2020 19:01 harro Updated [Operator, Narrative, Accident report, ]

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