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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 37153
Last updated: 1 February 2021
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Date:09-NOV-2000
Time:19:40
Type:Silhouette image of generic P28A model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Piper PA-28-140
Owner/operator:Private
Registration: N513FL
C/n / msn: 28-7125337
Fatalities:Fatalities: 1 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:Stuart, VA -   United States of America
Phase: En route
Nature:Private
Departure airport:College Park, MD (CSG)
Destination airport:Greenville, SC (GSO)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
About 2 hours before departure, the instrument rated pilot obtained weather information from DUATS. The weather information he selected included surface observations, radar summaries, and terminal forecasts for the area along his intended route of flight. The pilot did not request or obtain in-flight weather advisories, which were issued for IFR conditions, mountain obscuration, icing, and turbulence along the intended route of flight. Review of surface observations for airports along the intended route of flight, indicated that instrument meteorological conditions prevailed. The pilot departed on the night cross country flight without filing a flight plan. The airplane was reported missing, and was located 9 days later in mountainous terrain. The wreckage was located at an elevation of about 2,600 feet MSL, and the height of the mountain was about 3,211 feet MSL. Initial tree impact scars encompassed several trees, and appeared to be level along the tops of the trees. The width of the scars was about 30-feet and became progressively lower and narrower in the direction of the wreckage. Examination of the airplane and engine revealed there were no mechanical deficiencies.
Probable Cause: Pilot's continued flight into known adverse weather conditions during cruise flight. Factors in the accident were the low ceiling, dark night, and the pilot's failure to obtain in-flight weather advisories.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20001220X45454&key=1


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
24-Oct-2008 10:30 ASN archive Added
21-Dec-2016 19:23 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]
24-Oct-2017 17:21 peterhantelman Updated [Departure airport]
12-Dec-2017 19:29 ASN Update Bot Updated [Operator, Departure airport, Source, Narrative]

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