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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 37508
Last updated: 26 December 2020
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Date:25-JAN-1997
Time:18:25
Type:Silhouette image of generic C172 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Cessna 172F
Owner/operator:private
Registration: N8835U
C/n / msn: 17252745
Fatalities:Fatalities: 1 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:Conrad, PA -   United States of America
Phase: En route
Nature:Private
Departure airport:State College, PA (UNV)
Destination airport:Elmira, NY (ELM)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
During a telephonic weather briefing from the Altoona Flight Service Station, the pilot stated he intended to fly VFR from State College, PA, to Elmira, NY. The briefer advised that '...VFR was not recommended...' due to mountain obscurations and 'quite strong' winds. A review of radar data revealed the airplane traveled in a northerly direction (at night) with several heading deviations as great as 270 degrees. The en route altitude varied from 3,200 to 4,100 feet. The radar track then depicted a descending right spiral from about 4,000 feet that terminated in the vicinity of the accident site. Subsequently, the airplane collided with trees and terrain along a 2,100 ridge, about 15 miles west of the intended course. Wreckage was scattered about 342 feet on a westerly heading. No preimpact mechanical failure was found that would have resulted in the accident. The pilot had logged about 111 hours total flight time with about 1 hour of instrument flight time. CAUSE: VFR flight by the pilot into instrument meteorological conditions (IMC), and spatial disorientation of the pilot, which led to loss of aircraft control, an uncontrolled descent, and subsequent collision with wooded terrain. Factors relating to the accident were: darkness, adverse weather conditions, the pilot's lack of instrument experience, and the wooded, mountainous/hilly terrain.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20001208X07346


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
24-Oct-2008 10:30 ASN archive Added
21-Dec-2016 19:23 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]

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