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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 38237
Last updated: 7 May 2020
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Date:24-FEB-1996
Time:16:47
Type:Silhouette image of generic C170 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Cessna 170A
Owner/operator:private
Registration: N9523A
C/n / msn: 19084
Fatalities:Fatalities: 4 / Occupants: 4
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:Proctor, AR -   United States of America
Phase: En route
Nature:Private
Departure airport:Little Rock, AR (LIT)
Destination airport:West Memphis, AR (AWM)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
Witnesses on Interstate 40 observed both airplanes traveling in opposite directions on a collision course at an estimated altitude of 1,000 feet above the ground. The witnesses further stated that the pilots of both airplanes attempted to avoid the collision by banking to their left. They observed one wing and debris fall to the ground as 'both airplanes nosed dived to the ground.' The airplanes came to rest in a nose down attitude on cultivated fields about 1/2 mile apart. The collision occurred in class G airspace approximately 7 miles west of an uncontrolled airport served with Unicom. The Cessna 182 was headed westbound and the Cessna 170 was on an easterly heading to enter the traffic pattern at the airport. The visibility in the vicinity of the accident was estimated to be in excess of 20 miles. An airline transport rated pilot, who witnessed the accident, reported the presence of high cirrus clouds and said 'the sun was setting but the clouds were obstructing the sun so there was no glare.' Both airplanes were equipped with 2-way radio communication; however, the frequencies being monitored by the pilot of each airplane could not be determined due to damage. CAUSE: failure of the pilots in both airplanes to see-and-avoid conflicting traffic (inadequate visual lookout).

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20001208X05240


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
24-Oct-2008 10:30 ASN archive Added
21-Dec-2016 19:23 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]

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