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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 40295
Last updated: 8 December 2019
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Date:07-JUN-1997
Time:18:30
Type:Silhouette image of generic C206 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Cessna U206G
Owner/operator:private
Registration: N756PU
C/n / msn: U20604255
Fatalities:Fatalities: 1 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:Saugus, CA -   United States of America
Phase: Manoeuvring (airshow, firefighting, ag.ops.)
Nature:Private
Departure airport:Mammoth Lakes, CA (MMH)
Destination airport:Burbank, CA (BUR)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
The pilot told air traffic control (ATC) that he was over a hole in the clouds and planned to descend through it en route to his destination. ATC advised the pilot that the area was overcast and issued the current destination weather. ATC advised that radar contact had been lost and the pilot acknowledged. ATC twice requested that the pilot ident but received no beacon returns. After ATC advised the pilot that radar contact was lost and issued the tower frequency, no further communications were received. The weather was scattered clouds at 8,000 and 15,000 feet with 40 miles visibility north of a mountain ridge. South of the ridge were scattered clouds at 2,500 feet and a broken ceiling at 3,300 feet with 7 miles visibility. Estimated cloud tops were about 8,000 feet. The highest terrain between the pilot and his destination was about 4,000 feet. The aircraft crashed on an ascending northern slope at the 3,700-foot elevation. The pilot had received a weather forecast that included obscuration in the vicinity of mountains, turbulence, and precipitation throughout the evening with VFR flight not recommended. CAUSE: the pilot's failure to maintain an adequate terrain clearance altitude while attempting VFR flight into instrument meteorological conditions.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20001208X08158


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
24-Oct-2008 10:30 ASN archive Added
21-Dec-2016 19:23 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]

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