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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 41385
Last updated: 2 December 2020
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Date:13-JUL-1997
Time:02:24
Type:Silhouette image of generic C82R model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Cessna TR182 Turbo Skylane RG
Owner/operator:Century Air
Registration: N737PK
C/n / msn: R18200865
Fatalities:Fatalities: 2 / Occupants: 2
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:Seaside Heights, NJ -   United States of America
Phase: En route
Nature:Private
Departure airport:Linden, NJ (LDJ)
Destination airport:Atlantic City, NJ
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
The pilot departed on a night cross-country flight. The airplane was observed on radar to climb to 2,500 feet and level off. When the airplane reached the coast line, it turned south, paralleled the coast, and began a descent. The airplane descended at 500 feet per minute, until it went below radar coverage at 1,000 feet, about 5 miles north of the accident area. Witnesses observed the airplane flying level, parallel to the coast, about 150 feet above the water, and fly over an amusement park pier. The airplane then turned left away from the coast to the open ocean, then it began another left turn to the north. During the northerly turn, it descended, struck the water, and sank about 1/2 mile off shore in the Atlantic Ocean, about 0230 EDT. The wreckage was not recovered. Nautical twilight was at 0426, and the moon was 20 degrees below the horizon. The pilot was not instrument rated, and 4 hours of dual night were documented on a 1 year old flight examination form. CAUSE: failure of the pilot to maintain sufficient altitude/clearance above water, while maneuvering over the ocean during a dark moonless night. Related factors were: darkness, the pilot's probable illusion of altitude, spatial disorientation, and lack of instrument experience.

Sources:

NTSB: http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20001208X08478


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
24-Oct-2008 10:30 ASN archive Added
21-Dec-2016 19:23 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]

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