ASN logo
ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 41853
Last updated: 11 January 2020
This information is added by users of ASN. Neither ASN nor the Flight Safety Foundation are responsible for the completeness or correctness of this information. If you feel this information is incomplete or incorrect, you can submit corrected information.

Date:03-AUG-1998
Time:02:03
Type:Silhouette image of generic C177 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Cessna 177
Owner/operator:private
Registration: N2213Y
C/n / msn: 17700013
Fatalities:Fatalities: 1 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:Red Lodge, MT -   United States of America
Phase: Unknown
Nature:Private
Departure airport:Wells, NV (LWL)
Destination airport:Unknown
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
The aircraft departed Wells, Nevada, at 2145 Pacific daylight time on August 2. The pilot did not file a flight plan, and no air traffic services were provided to the flight. The aircraft was reported missing on August 9 and a search was initiated. During the search, the Salt Lake Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) isolated a 1200 beacon code tracking northeast into the accident area between 11,600 and 11,800 feet. The last radar position in this series was recorded approximately 0203 mountain daylight time on August 3, at an altitude of 11,600 feet. The aircraft wreckage was found on August 12 at the 11,900-foot level on the west slope of 12,204-foot Mount Rearguard near Red Lodge, Montana, approximately 1 1/2 nautical miles northeast of the last Salt Lake ARTCC radar position. The accident site was roughly on a line from Wells to Minot, North Dakota, a potential intermediate destination listed in the FAA Alert Notice (ALNOT) on the missing aircraft. Evidence found at the accident site was consistent with a generally straight-and-level impact into the mountainside on a northeasterly track. No evidence of preimpact aircraft mechanical problems was found. CAUSE: The pilot's failure to maintain adequate altitude over, or clearance with, mountainous terrain during night visual flight rules flight. Factors included night lighting conditions and mountainous terrain.

Sources:

NTSB: http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20001211X10951


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
24-Oct-2008 10:30 ASN archive Added
21-Dec-2016 19:24 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]

Corrections or additions? ... Edit this accident description