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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 43808
Last updated: 3 October 2019
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Date:26-APR-2007
Time:14:30
Type:Silhouette image of generic PA38 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Piper PA-38-112 Tomahawk
Owner/operator:Private
Registration: N9247T
C/n / msn: 38-78A0295
Fatalities:Fatalities: 1 / Occupants: 1
Aircraft damage: Substantial
Category:Accident
Location:Dawsonville, GA -   United States of America
Phase: En route
Nature:Private
Departure airport:Cornelia, GA (AJR)
Destination airport:Cincinnati, OH (LUK)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
On the morning of the accident, the instrument-rated pilot called an automated flight service station (AFSS) for a weather briefing. The briefer informed the pilot that there were thunderstorms and rain showers that extend to his destination. Following the briefing, the pilot ended the conversation with, “let me figure out which way is the best way to go and then maybe ill call back and file.” No further calls from the pilot were received by any AFSS. According to a witness, who was a certified flight instructor and lived near the mountainous accident site, he stepped out onto his back deck and watched a white T-tail airplane flying about an “approximate altitude of 2600 to 3000 feet mean sea level (MSL), headed in a north northeast direction, flying level.” The witness stated that the airplane was flying about 300 feet above the base of the lowest cloud layer, in and out of the clouds. The airplane was reported missing by family members the following morning and located by the Civil Air Patrol the next day. Examination of the wreckage did not reveal any evidence of any preimpact mechanical anomalies. The pilot had over 3000 hours of total flight time. The pilot did not file an instrument flight rules flight plan and continued his flight into adverse weather, with a low cloud ceiling, while crossing mountainous terrain.
Probable Cause: The pilot’s improper decision to continue visual flight rules flight into instrument meteorological conditions, with a low cloud ceiling, over mountainous terrain.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20070503X00507&key=1

Safety recommendations:

Safety recommendation A-10-1 issued 29 January 2010 by NTSB to FAA
Safety recommendation A-10-2 issued 29 January 2010 by NTSB to FAA
Safety recommendation A-10-3 issued 29 January 2010 by NTSB to FAA
Safety recommendation A-10-35 issued 29 January 2010 by NTSB to AIR FORCE RESCUE COORDINATION CENTER
Safety recommendation A-10-4 issued 29 January 2010 by NTSB to FAA
Safety recommendation A-10-5 issued 29 January 2010 by NTSB to FAA
Safety recommendation A-10-6 issued 29 January 2010 by NTSB to FAA
Safety recommendation A-10-7 issued 29 January 2010 by NTSB to FAA
Safety recommendation A-10-8 issued 29 January 2010 by NTSB to FAA
Safety recommendation A-10-9 issued 29 January 2010 by NTSB to FAA


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
28-Oct-2008 00:45 ASN archive Added
21-Dec-2016 19:24 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]
04-Dec-2017 18:36 ASN Update Bot Updated [Cn, Operator, Other fatalities, Destination airport, Source, Narrative]

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