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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 44254
Last updated: 25 November 2019
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Date:12-DEC-2005
Time:11:29
Type:Silhouette image of generic BE23 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Beechcraft A23
Owner/operator:Private
Registration: N3590R
C/n / msn: M782
Fatalities:Fatalities: 2 / Occupants: 2
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:Mammoth Lakes, CA -   United States of America
Phase: En route
Nature:Private
Departure airport:Redlands, CA (L12)
Destination airport:Mammoth Lakes, CA (MMH)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
The airplane collided with flat desert terrain following an in-flight loss of control. A witness about 1 mile south of the accident site heard a rough running engine, and looked up to see what it was. As the airplane traveled overhead, he heard the engine "popping/backfiring," which lasted about 3 seconds, and then the engine quit. He then saw the airplane "dip" to the right, in a "tumbling motion." The witness indicated that it was like a somersault with the nose dropping and the tail coming over the top. He saw about 2 to 3 revolutions of the airplane, which lasted a total time of about 8 seconds, and then the airplane dropped below tree level and collided with the ground. The witness reported that it was somewhat cloudy in the area, but the airplane was below the clouds. When he arrived at the accident site to render aid, he reported there was no frost/ice on the wings, and that it was not cold enough for the formation of frost/ice. Witnesses at the departure airport reported that the engine sounded like the exhaust system was leaking very badly or that either the exhaust or muffler was loose. An engine test run could not be conducted due to displacement of the crankshaft caused by the nose-down impact. An engine teardown revealed no discrepancies in the engine core or in the accessories that would have precluded normal operation.
Probable Cause: a loss of engine power for undetermined reasons, and, the failure of the pilot to maintain an adequate airspeed while maneuvering following the loss of power, which resulted in a stall/spin.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20051223X02007&key=1


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
28-Oct-2008 00:45 ASN archive Added
21-Dec-2016 19:24 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]
06-Dec-2017 11:36 ASN Update Bot Updated [Departure airport, Source, Narrative]

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