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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 45139
Last updated: 3 July 2021
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Date:23-JUL-2003
Time:08:52
Type:Silhouette image of generic B06 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Bell 206B JetRanger
Owner/operator:Jack Harter Helicopters, Inc.
Registration: N37741
MSN: 1695
Fatalities:Fatalities: 5 / Occupants: 5
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:Waialeale,Kauai, HI -   United States of America
Phase: En route
Nature:Unknown
Departure airport:Lihue, Kauai, HI (LIH)
Destination airport:
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
The Title 14, CFR part 135 helicopter air tour flight was entering a mountainous crater. A passenger's videotape showed that the flight was initially performed in visual meteorological conditions, but as the helicopter approached the crater's 5,000-foot msl rim, its proximity to the clouds decreased, and the videotape ended. The videotape showed that the clouds were both above and below the helicopter. Recorded radar data, which ended about the time of the crash, showed that during the final few seconds of flight, the pilot maneuvered over the area, and its ground speed decreased from about 100 to 5 knots. Within the last 14 seconds of flight a descent was initiated, which increased in vertical speed to 2,000 feet per minute. The helicopter collided with the interior wall of the crater, and tumbled down slope, destroying the helicopter. Based upon flight path, terrain gradient and structural damage signatures, NTSB calculations indicated that the helicopter initially contacted the mountainside with a skid while descending in at least a 45-degree nose low pitch attitude. The engine and airframe wreckage were recovered, and no evidence of a mechanical malfunction was found.
Probable Cause: The pilot's failure to maintain adequate terrain clearance/altitude while descending over mountainous terrain, and his continued flight into adverse weather. Factors contributing to the accident were clouds and a low ceiling.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20030806X01273&key=1

Location


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
28-Oct-2008 00:45 ASN archive Added
21-Dec-2016 19:24 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]
08-Dec-2017 18:54 ASN Update Bot Updated [Operator, Destination airport, Source, Narrative]

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