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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 45203
Last updated: 11 December 2019
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Date:07-JUN-2003
Time:21:45
Type:Silhouette image of generic C172 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Cessna 172P
Owner/operator:Wausau Flying Service
Registration: N63319
C/n / msn: 17275421
Fatalities:Fatalities: 2 / Occupants: 2
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:Sheboygan, WI -   United States of America
Phase: Unknown
Nature:Private
Departure airport:Sheboygan, WI (SBM)
Destination airport:Wausau, WI (AUW)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
The airplane impacted the terrain following a loss of control on takeoff. There were no known eyewitnesses who saw the takeoff or accident. The person who dropped the pilot and passenger at the airport last saw the airplane as it began to taxi east on the ramp. Ear witnesses reporting hearing an engine go to "full power" followed by the sound of an impact. These ear witnesses reported horizontal visibility at the time was between 30 and 100 feet due to fog. The pilot called the automated weather observation (AWOS) at the departure airport and another airport prior to departure. The wreckage was located on airport property approximately 1,700 feet from the intersection of runways 13/21. Ground scars and the wreckage path leading to the main wreckage was on a heading of 264 degrees. Weather conditions at the departure airport recorded 4 minutes prior to the accident were temperature 8 degrees Celsius, dew point 8 degrees Celsius, visibility 1/4 mile with fog, and 100 feet indefinite ceiling. The pilot did not have an instrument rating. The Transport Canada Carburetor Icing Chart indicates that serious icing at any power setting was possible with the reported temperature and dewpoint spread.


Probable Cause: The pilot failed to maintain control of the airplane after encountering instrument meteorological conditions during takeoff. Factors associated with the accident were the low ceiling, fog and lack of instrument rating.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20030610X00829&key=1


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
28-Oct-2008 00:45 ASN archive Added
21-Dec-2016 19:24 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]
08-Dec-2017 18:51 ASN Update Bot Updated [Source, Narrative]

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