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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 45262
Last updated: 30 December 2020
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Date:20-MAR-2003
Time:19:10
Type:Silhouette image of generic C182 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Cessna 182S
Owner/operator:Cessna Employees Flying Club
Registration: N97TD
C/n / msn: 18280012
Fatalities:Fatalities: 1 / Occupants: 3
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:Fayetteville, AR -   United States of America
Phase: Approach
Nature:Private
Departure airport:Wichita, KS (ICT)
Destination airport:Fayetteville, AR (FYV)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
The 184-hour instrument rated private pilot was executing the LDA/DME RWY 34 instrument approach in actual instrument meteorological conditions when the airplane collided with trees approximately six miles south of the runway. Radar data indicated that the airplane was never stabilized on the approach, and had descended below the published minimum altitudes. The pilot reported that when the airplane crossed over the AWEMO intersection (final approach fix) it was at an altitude of 3,100 feet msl. The pilot felt that was high, so he continued to descend as he proceeded toward the next intersection, TRIUM. The pilot said that the airplane crossed the TRIUM intersection at an altitude of 2,600 feet msl, which he thought was high. He considered increasing the descent rate, but the airplane impacted trees. The radar data also indicated that the airplane had never reached the TRIUM intersection. A review of the LDA/DME RWY 34 approach plate revealed that the minimum crossing altitude at the AWEMO intersection was 4,000 feet msl, and 3,000 feet msl at the TRIUM intersection. Examination of the airplane did not reveal any mechanical deficiencies with the airplane or the engine.

















Probable Cause: The pilot's failure to fly a stabilized, published instrument approach procedure, which resulted in a collision with trees and terrain. Factors were the low clouds and night conditions.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20030324X00369&key=1


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
28-Oct-2008 00:45 ASN archive Added
21-Dec-2016 19:24 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]
08-Dec-2017 18:27 ASN Update Bot Updated [Source, Narrative]

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