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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 5914
Last updated: 18 January 2021
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Date:27-MAR-1968
Time:17:57
Type:Silhouette image of generic C150 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Cessna 150F
Owner/operator:Interstate Airmotive
Registration: N8669G
C/n / msn: 15062769
Fatalities:Fatalities: 2 / Occupants: 2
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:2,4 km N of Saint Louis-Lambert International Airport, MO (STL/KSTL) -   United States of America
Phase: Approach
Nature:Training
Departure airport:Saint Louis-Lambert International Airport, MO (STL/KSTL)
Destination airport:Saint Louis-Lambert International Airport, MO (STL/KSTL)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
An Ozark Air Lines DC-9, N970Z, and an Interstate Airmotive Cessna l5OF (N8669G) collided in flight approximately 1.5 miles north of Lambert Field, St. Louis, Missouri, at approximately 17:57 local time.
Both aircraft were in the landing pattern for Runway 17, under the jurisdiction of the St. Louis Tower, when the accident occurred.
The Cessna was demolished by the collision and ground impact, and both occupants were fatally injured. The DC-9 sustained light damage and was able to effect a safe landing.

PROBABLE CAUSE: "The combination of: the inadequacy of current VFR separation standards in controlled airspace, the crew of the DC-9 not sighting the Cessna in time to avoid it, the absence of VFR traffic pattern procedures to enhance an orderly flow of landing aircraft, the local controller not assuring that important landing information issued to the Cessna was received and understood under the circumstances of a heavy traffic situation without radar assistance, and the Cessna crew's deviation from their traffic pattern instructions and/or their continuation to a critical point in the traffic pattern without informing the local controllerof the progress of the flight."

Sources:

NTSB

Accident investigation:
cover
  
Investigating agency: NTSB
Status: Investigation completed
Duration: 1 year and 3 months
Download report: Final report


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
25-Feb-2008 12:00 ASN archive Added
17-Feb-2020 11:04 harro Updated [Cn, Operator, Location, Phase, Nature, Departure airport, Destination airport, Narrative, Accident report, ]

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