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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 48413
Last updated: 2 February 2020
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Date:16-JUN-2005
Time:09:00
Type:Silhouette image of generic ECHO model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Tecnam P92-S Echo
Owner/operator:unknown flying school
Registration: ZU-MIF
C/n / msn: 800
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Substantial
Location:Next to Runway 01 at Light Flight Aerodrome, Cato Ridge, KZN -   South Africa
Phase: Take off
Nature:Training
Departure airport:Light Flight Aerodrome, Cato Ridge
Destination airport:Light Flight Aerodrome, Cato Ridge
Narrative:
The Instructor and student pilot stated that after they had carried out a thorough pre-flight inspection they took off to fly circuit and landing exercises. After the second circuit a full stop landing was carried out. The student then took off again for solo circuits.
During the take-off roll, the aircraft started to veer to the left hand side of the runway. The pilot thought that he was experiencing a strong crosswind component and attempted corrective action by applying right rudder, but to no avail. By this time the aircraft was about to make contact with rising ground next to the runway which rises approximately half a meter higher than the runway surface. The pilot rotated the aircraft in an effort to clear the rising ground but the left wing made contact with the rising ground which caused the aircraft to ground loop in an anti-clockwise direction. The aircraft came to rest on its right hand side. After the accident, the pilot observed that the left main landing gear was lying on the runway from where he took off. The instructor who is also the Approved Person who certified the aircraft prior to the accident stated that he noticed that the bolt attaching the left main landing gear assembly to the fuselage of the aircraft sheared resulting in the left main gear departing from the aircraft during the take-off roll. The student pilot sustained no injuries. The aircraft sustained damage to the fuselage, propeller, undercarriage, right hand wing, front cowlings, engine mount and left hand horizontal stabiliser. After the accident, the pilot observed that the left main landing gear was lying on the runway from where he took off. The instructor who is also the Approved Person who certified the aircraft prior to the accident stated that he noticed that the bolt attaching the left main landing gear assembly to the fuselage of the aircraft sheared resulting in the left main landing gear departing from the aircraft during the take-off roll. The securing bolt which attaches the left main landing gear assembly to the fuselage was not recovered and therefore no metallurgical analysis could be performed to determine the cause for the failure. The aircraft was first registered in January 2004 and had a valid Authority to Fly which was issued on 15 February 2005. The annual inspection was certified on 14 February 2005 at a total of 319.7 airframe hours and the aircraft had flown 70.9 hours since the last annual inspection was certified. According to available records the Approved Person (AP) that certified the last annual inspection on the aircraft prior to the incident was in possession of a valid MISASA, Approved Person Approval, No.121. The flying school held a valid Aviation Training Organisation Accreditation and Approval Certificate, CAA/0083, which was issued on 25 October 2004 with an expiry date of 30 August 2005. The Civil Aviation Authority last audited the Aviation Training Organisation prior to the accident on 19 October 2004.

Probable Cause:
Undertermined

Sources:

1. SACAA Report


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
08-Nov-2008 01:41 Topaz Added
19-Jan-2009 10:08 harro Updated

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